Fonts

    From Oera Linda Wiki

    This page contains digital fonts which can be used to read and type the Fryas language in its native letters on computers, as well as resources for learning to write the letters by hand. All fonts were created by Pax Ravn and follow Jan Ott's Fryas-Latin transliteration convention.

    Fryas-Latin transliteration conventions

    Frya's Standskrift

    This font displays any Fryas text according to the style of the scribe or scribes who made the current copy of the Oera Linda book. The font recreates the Yule-based letters attributed to Frya, as well as Godfreyath's counting numbers, which are described on page [046] of the manuscript. The font is available under the SIL Open Font Licence. It can be downloaded from this link:

    Download (4.7 MB)

    Alternatively, it can be downloaded from the Oera Linda Foundation's webshop here, albeit without source files.

    Installation

    • Windows: Unpack the ZIP file. In the Fonts subfolder, double-click the OTF* file and agree to installation.
    • Mac: Unpack the ZIP file. In the Fonts subfolder, double-click the OTF* file. In the preview window that opens, install the font.
    • GNU/Linux: Move the OTF* file to ~/.local/share/fonts.

    After that, the font is available to use in word processors, image editors etc. under the name “Fryas Standskrift.”

    *If the OTF file does not work, try the TTF file.

    Preview

    Festa's Runskrift

    These practice sheets contain a reconstruction of how Festa's Runskrift was likely written, based on: 1) the specimen on page [046] of the manuscript, 2) comparison with cursive writing traditions, 3) practical considerations. Currently, there are sheets for writing single letters; advanced sheets will come in the future. They are available in A4 and Letter sizes.

    Isaac Pitman's duodecimal digits ↊ ↋ are included; if those do not interest you, ignore them. A variant of Ô is used where the circumflex is inside, like in the Standskrift letter. J is skipped for space reasons; that said, it is just I with a dot. The Runskrift F is ambiguous in the manuscript; a study below explains the author's interpretation; Greek φ (phi) is likely a direct descendant.

    The Runskrift resources are available in the public domain (CC0). They can be downloaded from this link:

    Download (1.1 MB)

    UPDATE: A comprehensive update is being worked on. Please see the forum thread for a more recent version of the Runskrift reconstruction.

    Preview

    Frya's Wagumskrift

    This font is an attempted reconstruction of what might have been the letter style on the walls of burgs. Seeing as the Greeks and Romans maintained two separate styles for writing majuscules on parchment and walls, and seeing as they inherited their letters from the Fryas, then it is reasonable to suggest that the Fryas themselves maintained two separate styles for parchment and walls and passed on those letter styles to the Greeks and Romans, who adapted them to their own needs.

    Assuming this is the case, it is obvious that all Fryas inscriptions have been destroyed. Thus, we have to infer what those inscriptions looked like based on the style of the Greek and Latin inscriptions and the shapes of the Standskrift letters. This font is the result of these inferences. In other words, the font attempts to fill out the blank in this table:

    Letter styles
    Parchment Inscription
    Greeks
    Greek writing on papyrus, 3rd century BC
    Greek inscription in Delphi, 4th or 5th century BC
    Greek inscription in Ephesus, 115 AD
    Romans
    Latin writing on papyrus, 41–54 AD
    Latin inscription on Pantheon, 27 BC – 14 AD
    Latin inscription on Arch of Titus, 81 AD
    Fryas
    Fryas writing on paper (page and line numbers added), copy from somewhere between 1256–1848 AD of writings pre-dating Graeco-Roman civilisation
    ???

    Even Old English, which preserves many characteristics of Fryas lost in other languages, has inscriptions with similarly styled letters all the way up to the 10th century. One may attribute this to Latin influence, but the unique Anglo-Saxon letters could indicate that the letter style is an old tradition which in modern times is erroneously called “Roman.”

    Old English inscription in Breamore, 10th century. “HER SWUTELAÐ SEO GECWYDRÆDNES ÐE”

    The Fryas never explicitly mention a separate letter style for inscriptions. Perhaps they called those letters Standskrift as well and made no distinction between the style of letters on parchment and walls. Alternatively, they wrote the letters on walls exactly the same way as on parchment. In any case, this font is named Wagumskrift (“wall script”) in order to maintain distinction with the Standskrift font.

    The font is available under the SIL Open Font Licence. It can be downloaded from this link:

    Download (6.7 MB)

    Installation

    Wagumskrift has three flavours: Wagumskrift (for 12pt sizes and above), Wagumskrift 10 (for 10pt) and Wagumskrift 8 (for 8pt). You should install all three.

    • Windows: Unpack the ZIP file. In the Fonts subfolder, double-click the OTF* files and agree to installation.
    • Mac: Unpack the ZIP file. In the Fonts subfolder, double-click the OTF* files. In the preview windows that open, install the fonts.
    • GNU/Linux: Move the OTF* files to ~/.local/share/fonts.

    After that, the fonts are available to use in word processors, image editors etc. under the names “Fryas Wagumskrift,” “Fryas Wagumskrift 10” and “Fryas Wagumskrift 8.”

    *If the OTF files do not work, try the TTF files.

    Preview