En 08c Tunis and Inka

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    Ott 2023

    8c. Tunis and Inka Depart

    [056/21] Here is where the history of Nef-Tunis and his kinsman Inka rightly begins.[1]

    All this is recorded not only on the walls of the Treasureburg, but also at the burg Stavia, which lies inland from the port of Staveren:

    When Tunis wished to return home with his ships, he went first towards the Denmarks. But he was not permitted to land there; this had been signaled by the mother. [057] Also at Fleeland he was not permitted to land, nor anywhere else. He would thus have perished with his men from want and hardship. Therefore, they went robbing the lands by night and sailing by day.

    Sailing along the coast like this, they arrived at the colony of Kaedik (Gadir, Cádiz), so called because its harbor was formed by a stone pier (‘quay-dyke’). Here they bought all manner of supplies, but Tutia the burgmaid would not allow them to settle there. When they were ready to depart, a dispute broke out between them. Tunis wanted to enter the strait of the Middle Sea in order to go and sail in the service of the rich king of the Egyptian lands,[2] as he had done before. But Inka said he had had enough of all Finda’s folk. Inka thought that a high-lying part of Atland might possibly remain as an island, where he and his people could live in peace. Thus, as the two kinsmen could not agree, Tunis went and planted a red flag on the beach, and Inka a blue one. Then everyone was able to choose whom he wanted to follow and, amazingly, Inka — who was loath to serve the kings of Finda’s folk — was chosen by most Finns and Magyars. When they had counted the crews and divided the ships accordingly, the fleets went their separate ways.

    Of Nef-Tunis, accounts would later reach us. But of Nef-Inka, nothing more was ever heard.

    Notes

    1. ‘Nef-Tunis and his kinsman Inka’ (NÉF.TÜNIS ÀND SIN NÉF INKA) — the root ‘nef’, ‘nep’ is known from many old languages to have meanings related to family (e.g., still found in words like: nepotism, nephew). The name Nef-Tunis seems obviously related to the sea-god Neptune. The use of this prefix may indicate that the people considered him one of their kin.
    2. In 2000 BCE this would have been Mentuhotep III of the Eleventh dynasty.

    Sandbach 1876

    [p.79 cont.] Next comes upon the stage the history of Neef Teunis and Neef Inka.

    All this is inscribed not only on the Waraburgt, but also on the Burgt Stavia, which lies behind the Port of Stavre.

    When Teunis wished to return home, he went first towards Denmark; but he might not land there, for so the [p.81] mother had ordered, nor was he to land at Flyland nor anywhere about there. In this way he would have lost all his people by want and hardship, so he landed at night to steal and sailed on by day. Thus coasting along, he at length arrived at the colony of Kadik (Cadiz), so called because it was built with a stone quay. Here they bought all kinds of stores, but Tuntia the Burgtmaagd would not allow them to settle there. When they were ready they began to disagree. Teunis wished to sail through the straits to the Mediterranean Sea, and enter the service of the rich Egyptian king, as he had done before, but Inka said he had had enough of all those Finda's people. Inka thought that perchance some high-lying part of Atland might remain as an island, where he and his people might live in peace. As the two cousins could not agree, Teunis planted a red flag on the shore, and Inka a blue flag. Every man could choose which he pleased, and to their astonishment the greater part of the Finns and Magyars followed Inka, who had objected to serve the kings of Finda's people. When they had counted the people and divided the ships accordingly, the fleet separated. We shall hear of Teunis afterwards, but nothing more of Inka.


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